Rogoway Turquoise Tortoise Gallery | Tubac AZ

Check out what the media has to say about Rogoway Turquoise Tortoise Gallery.

Western Art & Architecture, October/November 2012, Vol. 6, No. 5, pages 114-118.

Western Art and Architecture Press

Western Art and Architecture Oct/Nov 2012, Vol.6 No. 5

An excerpt:
Rogoway Turquoise Tortoise Gallery pulls you in with an appealing design that is both stimulating and soothing. There’s a cheeriness to the uncluttered shop that stays with me. Eye-catching contemporary pieces line the walls like the long, lean Western silhouettes of Manny Valenzuela and glass cases of beautiful handcrafted jewelry.

Read the entire article at: Western Art and Architecture article Article by Roger Naylor.


The Tubac Villager, February 2010 Vol V, No. 4, pages 2 and 34


An excerpt:
An art gallery with a Steinway baby grand on display? Yes, the piano is a piece of art, among many other exquisite items. The Rogoway and Turquoise Tortoise Gallery on Calle Baca is the only gallery in Tubac to display a piano.

Can visitors play it? Co-owner Jacqueline Zeitler said that’s encouraged as long as someone “knows how.” In fact, other shoppers are usually delighted when someone sits down to interpret one or several musical pieces.

“The most unlikely person will sit down, and it’s just magic. It’s beautiful. An the customers love it. They don’t forget,” she said.

Deborah Barrios and Zeitler became the owners on April 1, 2009, of the long-established Rogoway and Turquoise Tortoise Gallery on Calle Baca in Tubac. Previous owners were Esther and Larry Fitzpatrick.

The gallery features vibrantly colored paintings, sculpture, fountains, gourd art, pottery and art glass. Jewelry is prominently displayed in glass cabinets and many necklaces, bracelets and earrings are enhanced by turquoise, which isn’t surprising given the name of the shop. Much of the jewelry is certified Native American.

You can look through this issue of the Tubac Villager here: Rogoway Gallery in the Tubac Villager


Santa Cruz Valley Sun, Wed. Nov 25, 2009, page 1

An excerpt:
Art that relishes innovation ad generates excitement best describes “The Piano Story” as it was told recently at Rogoway’s Turquoise Tortoise Gallery in Tubac.

As a contribution to Tubac’s annual “Art Experience,” owners Deborah Barrios and Jacqueline Zeitler hosted the “narrative concert” on Nov. 6-7. Argentine concert pianist Mario Merdirossian told and played the captivating story of the piano; from its invention more than three centuries ago until today.

He used charts and examples to demonstrate how the piano evolved from the harpsichord, clavier and pianoforte.

Merdirossian explained that all musical instruments were developed in an attempt to mimic the human voice, the most versatile instrument of all. By the judicious selection of the pieces he played, he was able to demonstrate the difference in sound and texture between a piano and its ancestor the harpsichord. His talk was peppered with wonderful anecdotes about life at court, in the days when only royalty could afford the very expensive handmade pianos. It wasn’t until the end of the 19th century that pianos were mass-produced and available to all.


Community, Tuesday, Nov 24, 2009, page 7A


An excerpt:
Art that relishes innovation ad generates excitement best describes “The Piano Story” as it was told recently at Rogoway’s Turquoise Tortoise Gallery in Tubac. As a contribution to Tubac’s annual “Art Experience,” owners Deborah Barrios and Jacqueline Zeitler hosted the unique event called a “narrative concert,” Nov. 6-7. In a highly entertaining manner, Argentine concert pianist Mario Merdirossian, told and played the captivating story of the piano; from its invention more than three centuries ago until today.

How the piano evolved
Merdirossian offered his audience a guided tour of the history of the piano. In addition to what he played, he used charts and small examples to demonstrate how the piano evolved from the harpsichord, clavier , and pianoforte.

Merdirossian explained that all musical instruments were developed in an attempt to mimic the human voice, the most versatile instrument of all. By the judicious selection of the pieces he played, he was able to demonstrate the difference in sound and texture between a piano and its ancestor the harpsichord.

His talk was peppered with wonderful anecdotes about life at court, in the days when only royalty could afford the very expensive handmade pianos. It wasn’t until the end of the 19th century that pianos were mass-produced and available to all.
The event featured three baby grand and grand pianos from a privately owned Steinway vintage collection. These Steinway pianos, all professionally restored, dated from 1892, 1912 and 1938. They were built during Steinway’s “Golden Era.”


Members of the media: For photographs or to schedule interviews, please contact gallery owners Jacqueline Zeitler and Deborah Barrios by telephone at 520-398-2041 or use our online form to contact Rogoway Turquoise Tortoise by email.